• Black people in America,  Frederick Douglass,  human rights,  inequality,  state violence

    Speech: “What, To The Slave, Is The Fourth Of July?”

    by Frederick Douglass, 1852 Mr. President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my ability, than I do this day. A feeling has crept over me, quite unfavorable to the exercise of my limited powers of speech. The task before me is one which requires much previous thought and study for its proper performance. I know that apologies of this sort are generally considered flat and unmeaning. I trust, however, that mine will not be so…

  • Black people in America,  Frederick Douglass

    More And More About Frederick Douglass

    by Robert BenzCo-Founder, Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives As Co-Founder of Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives, I’m able to publish, exclusively, the following statement from the direct descendants of Frederick Douglass: The President’s comments from the Roosevelt Room of the White House, about Frederick Douglass, were noted and appreciated by us, the Douglass family. In fact, we believe, if he had more time to elaborate, the President would have mentioned the following: “Frederick Douglass has done an amazing job … * Enduring the inhumanity of slavery after being born heir to anguish and exploitation but still managing to become a force for solace and liberty when America needed it most, * Recognizing that…

×